Blog

What if Your Athlete Always Sees the Glass Half Empty?

Let’s start small, your kid is on a losing team. If your kids are anything like mine, that’s difficult because they’re competitive and want to win. Here’s how we handle this situation (and by we, I really mean Todd, because he’s awesome at this!).   When your kid feels stuck on a losing team, lots of things can go the wrong way. Negativity seeps into your happy-go-lucky child. A child who once brushed off a loss begins to get angry with each subsequent loss.   It is our job as parents to rein that in.   We teach our kids it’s ok to be angry after a loss. But, we also talk to them about appropriate behavior. We tell our kids to be mad, take a few breaths and be…

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What If Your Athlete Just Wants to Love the Game Not Train?

I asked him why and if he really wanted to play hockey. His response was ” I want to play hockey with daddy but not where you have to shoot the puck at those guys.” So I responded, “you just like skating around with daddy and your brothers?”   Parker said yes, and that was that.   As a hockey family, my husband and I just assumed the boys would all play hockey because they all enjoy the sport. I had to take a step back and remember how different my kids are. I think sometimes as parents we push ideas on our kids that we want them to enjoy, things they should do.   My Parker just wanted to love the game and not train for it.   Read…

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Don’t Mess This Up: Your Role as a Sports Parent

For any athlete to become a champion, which means going as far as possible in their sport, it takes a total team effort behind them. Without the appropriate support and guidance of coaches and parents, real success in sports is virtually impossible!   The key here is that each member of the ATHLETE-PARENT-COACH team “play” the right role, and play it to the very best of their abilities!   Read Dr. Goldberg’s article here at What Your Child Need Most…    

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How to Teach Your Child to be a Team Player

Just because your child is on a team does not make them a team player.   Team players are athletes who play because they love the game and understand the idea that they are playing a team–not an individual–sport.   It’s not easy being a team player. As humans, our natural tendency is to be concerned only about what’s good for me. But a team player sees the big picture and knows that sometimes what’s best for the team is not always going to agree with what’s good for me.   How can you help your child be a team player?   Teach Your Child to Spell.   There is no “I” in the word team. It’s not about how many points I score, how many tackles I chalk up,…

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Sports Moms Sound Off: Best Cameras for Sports Moms

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Best 3 Tips for Bleacher Behavior

My journey as a sports mom began over 25 years ago when my oldest, now 31, became a little gymnast.   All three of my children started sports before they started school and between the three of them, played 8 different sports.  If you add up all the hours I’ve spent watching my kids play sports growing up and in college and my husband coach for 29 years, it would amount to over 10 straight months of watching competitions–24/7.   Through the years I’ve learned a few lessons on how to appropriately behave as a spectator.   Of course, I blew it a lot at the beginning–yelled things to the refs I shouldn’t have, struggled with bad attitudes towards coaches or players–and sometimes, but I did finally learn some things…

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A Grocery Game Plan for Sports Moms

Does grocery shopping have you needing Excedrin Migraine and a nap?     You are not alone!     Grocery stores thrive on confusion and impulsivity. They hope you become overwhelmed, hungry and confused so that you are not an informed shopper.   This leads us to grab food off the end caps which generally is not much of a bargain.     As we rush through the store we gravitate towards foods that are generally within our eyesight. We tend to be less organized dependent on our brain’s ability to recollect visual grocery lists as well as mapping out the schedules of your children’s many activities.   Here are some tips to help make grocery shopping more manageable and life at home less stressful.     1.  Build Your…

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You Might Be A Sports Mom If…

I have t-shirts proudly proclaiming it and my car confirms it.   I AM A SPORTS MAMA!   You?   Then I bet some of these (or all of these) apply to you, too!   Straight from the Sports Mamas who know best,  you might be a Sports Mama if…   When you make a trip to the car wash for baseball pants and leave with a dirty car. – Stacy Elwartowski   You have 47 half-empty water bottles rolling around in your 7 passenger mobile locker room. Oh and I only have 2 kids…of my own. – Shanon Lessard     When someone asks “what’d you do this weekend” and the answer never features “slept, read a book, cleaned my house, went to the pool, etc” – Heather Hawkins    …

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10 Ideas For Daily Sports Mom Self-Care

Self-care activities can easily be added to your daily routine without changing much or adding a lot of time to your day. It’s not hard if you try to make it simple.   Let’s look at 10 simple ideas you can do to add self-care to your daily life:   Wake up Earlier  Wake up just thirty minutes earlier than normal. Make a cup of coffee or tea and go outside and breathe in a few breaths of fresh air. Alternatively, you can choose to go for a walk, read the newspaper, or read a book. It’s up to you, but don’t do anything that makes you stressed out. This is quiet time JUST FOR YOU.   Use Wait Times  Sports moms know all about wait times.   Who else…

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Does Yelling Instructions Hurt My Kid?

I watch and keep my mouth shut, but honestly… it’s so. incredibly. hard.   As a sports mom (and a competitive, former college athlete) I want to share my experience.   Trap! Trap! Trap! I want to scream to my son while watching his basketball game. The opponent is dribbling straight into the corner of the court! He’s in the perfect position to be well…trapped.   And so am I.   I get trapped by my need to continue to parent, to give instruction and to be helpful when my help and instruction are no longer needed or helpful.     In fact, my attempt to help is actually hurting my athlete.   Dr. Alan Goldberg,  Sports Performance Consultant and internationally-known expert in peak performance, says this… When you offer technique,…

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